Join the Conversation

This is a quick note to welcome our many new readers to the Bible Design and Binding Blog. The message of this blog is, You are not alone! There are people out there who share your obsessive interest in quality and aesthetics, and this is where they hang out. Read the reviews and blog posts, but most importantly be sure to check out the comments threads, where people with much more insight than I have are freely sharing it. I want to thank everyone who has contributed to the dialogue, and encourage those of you who are just lurking to jump right in. This is a place to have your questions answered, so ask away!

37 Comments on “Join the Conversation

  1. Thanks for setting this blog up – very cool! Have you had a chance to look at any of the Holman CSB leather bindings from B&H? I’d be curious to hear any thoughts as they are in scarce physical supply here in Minnesota…

  2. ElShaddai,
    Mark probably knows better than I, but I’ve handled the HCSB minister’s Bible and the HCSB Apologatics study bible in genuine leather. Both have sewn bindings and seem pretty well made (although one of the minister’s Bibles at the bookstore was standing up on the shelf and the top part of the text block was pulling away from the spine due to the weight, but the others seemed fine). The ministers Bible’s paper is way too thin IMO, but the Apologetic’s study Bible’s paper is nice. Similar to the NIV Archaeological study Bible’s paper. On both the Minister’s and Apologetics Bible, the genuine leather is similar to a Zondervan NIV genuine leather Bible. I.e., nothing spectacular, but useable. Probably too cardboard-like to be featured on this blog! ;)
    Hope that helps,
    Dave

  3. I really appreciate your blog–thank-you! It would be interesting to see a “top 10″ list of the best and worst in binding/design.
    Richard of the Great White North

  4. Mark,
    Thanks for initiating this conversation and inviting us to join you. At this time I don’t have anything new to add to the conversation. However, I do want you to know that your passion and mission (if it can be called a mission) resonates with me. Perhaps our collective voice will influence and determine a few Bible publishing projects that are beneficial and beautiful.
    Beneficial includes the topics you write about so knowledgeably, i.e. typesetting, typography, layout and design, readability, paper and binding, etc. Beauty, ah beauty! Let me mention a few: the aesthetic attraction of fine leather you smell and caress,something that ages along with you and becomes a part of you taking on your form and characteristics, your personality; the perfections of fine paper suitable for reading and writing, delicate and durable; gilded ages that reflect the treasured contents; ribbons to mark your last or next appointments with God; and, wide margins sufficient for annotations with elegant page proportions. After all, doesn’t it seem right, isn’t it congruent for the glory of the Word of God to be matched, to be beneficial and beautiful? Evidently some of us think so.
    Just a personal note. I have been a Bible student, pastor and missionary for more than thirty years. Yet, it wasn’t until I read you blog that I ordered my first premeir Bible, an ESV tan highland goatskin leather. from Allan’s. It is a work of art.
    Thanks for raising the standard for Bible publishing projects.
    Don

  5. Thanks for the invitation. I am loaded with questions which I will probably ask one at a time. What do people who care about high quality bindings and paper think of writing in your bibles? I found Jose post about pens helpful and went out and purchased some. Is this the place to post questions or should we email you?? What if a question doesn’t relate to the post? I picked up 2 of the cheap but nice esv portfolio style. My wife is especially enjoying it. Thanks for the recommendation. Peace.

  6. I used to highlight and write in pencil or blue pen but have now stopped for various reasons. I am currently using archival quality pens for underlining and writing.
    Regarding writing in your bibles, I prefer non-excessive marking since it can become difficult and distracting in the future when I reread the passage. If the bible in wide margin than I may include more detailed notes.

  7. Regarding writing in your Bible: Unless I anticipate giving it away, I always write in my Bibles. It just doesn’t feel like my own until I scrawl something in it no matter the cost/quality of the Bible. I want it to be “my” tool…”my” sword that I can wield easily. I like a well used and marked Bible. It can be a record of your spiritual pilgrimage.
    The biggest issue I have is that I own too many swords! I remember when I was a new believer and I owned just one Bible. I had almost every location in that thing memorized from constant use. I believe we subconsciously pick up on these things. I play guitar and it works the same way. Also, different guitars have different feels. Different Bibles are laid out different ways. I tend to have to “scramble” to find that passage in a Bible I’m not accustomed to. It’s great to have a large arsenal of weapons but I guess I need to pick up one sword out of the pile and put my fingerprints all over it…to make it my main weapon. I can use the others but repetition with the one seems to form a bond. Have any of you other folks noticed this?
    Thanks Mark for your great site. It seems that most of the threads do indeed start to take on a life of their own! :)

  8. Regarding writing in your Bible: Unless I anticipate giving it away, I always write in my Bibles. It just doesn’t feel like my own until I scrawl something in it no matter the cost/quality of the Bible. I want it to be “my” tool…”my” sword that I can wield easily. I like a well used and marked Bible. It can be a record of your spiritual pilgrimage.
    The biggest issue I have is that I own too many swords! I remember when I was a new believer and I owned just one Bible. I had almost every location in that thing memorized from constant use. I believe we subconsciously pick up on these things. I play guitar and it works the same way. Also, different guitars have different feels. Different Bibles are laid out different ways. I tend to have to “scramble” to find that passage in a Bible I’m not accustomed to. It’s great to have a large arsenal of weapons but I guess I need to pick up one sword out of the pile and put my fingerprints all over it…to make it my main weapon. I can use the others but repetition with the one seems to form a bond. Have any of you other folks noticed this?
    Thanks Mark for your great site. It seems that most of the threads do indeed start to take on a life of their own! :)

  9. You are so right about that too many Bibles thing. Sometimes I have a hard time picking which one I want to take with me. It is also part of the problem with pulling the trigger for a high quality bible. I could buy one now but next week a better one comes out and don’t forget the ESV study bible coming out in a yesr or so!! What is a bibliophile to do!?!
    Another question: What do you folks think of bible covers leather or otherwise? Is there anyone out there who will not write in their bible?

  10. The hardest for me in deciding to get a good Bible that would last is that I decided to switch to the ESV, but none of the high quality Bibles came with the updated text (or would, I estimated, in the year or so after I wanted to buy). In the end, I did purchase the Allan’s ESV (3 or 4 months ago now).
    On Bible covers, I am pretty sure one hastened the degradation of my bonded-leather Life Application Study Bible’s cover & binding. I am using one now for my new Allan’s, but only as a carrying case for when I leave the house with it; I don’t actually fit the Bible’s cover into the cover itself.
    Also, I’m a guy that doesn’t write in my Bible at all. Perhaps its my level of confidence or maturity, but its just not something that seems right for me to be doing yet.

  11. Concerning Bible covers: I don’t use them. On my job I carry multiple Bibles (yes, at least three and a commentary or other book) in one of those over-the-shoulder type bags. I keep my Bibles in their respective boxes inside the bag with all my pens and such (yes, I am a total geek). When going to church or a Bible study, I simply carry the Bible naked. I like to feel the leather and don’t want to be encumbered by a cover. I tend to think that the oil from your hands helps keep the leather soft and supple. This is just me.
    Concerning Bible Marking: Here’s some interesting links on D.L. Moody:
    http://www.wholesomewords.org/etexts/moody/moodybmk.html
    http://www.biblebelievers.com/moody/20.html
    Kinda makes me want to have that one sword mentioned earlier. I sometimes think that our consumer mentality, which breeds discontent in many things, may also breed discontent in our Bibles. Not the actual word of God, of course, but the translation, the format, the construction, etc.. No translation is perfect and never will be but I do think it important to pick one to use regularly for memorizing, study, teaching, etc.. Wouldn’t it be great to have one like Moody’s that you invested much time and toil in, that had been with you for years, that had seen great use, that you could slide your hands over and find just what you are looking for without skipping a beat? Is this my quest or am I simply infected with discontent and the inability to commit to one Bible? Is finding a Bible like finding a mate? If we find a good one should we settle down and commit to it without having our eyes checking out the latest thing? Are we really actually searching for the perfect Bible? Is “she” out there? Maybe this is a confession of a guy that finds it hard to commit. Any others out there like me? Am I completely warped? Is there hope? :)

  12. I do not think that the cover actually led to the degradation to the Life Application Study Bible. It is a huge Bible at 2″ thick with a glued binding and the quality of the bonded leather is poor. Consider not using the cover on your Allan’s Bible as the oil form your hand will actually help preserve the leather.
    The ESV’s with the updated text and calfskin are the Single Column Reference and the Large Print

  13. Good point about the construction quality of the Life Application Study Bible; 5 years of use could have simply been too much for it.
    As for the cover for my Allan’s, I only use for carrying the Bible to church & back in an attempt to protect it from the elements. I don’t want to have to worry about it too much juggling it, the kids and whatever else we’ve hauled along for the trip.
    Also, it’ll be nice when the updated ESV text filters into all the premium editions, but realistically I bought this Bible with the expectation that it would have the durability to be my primary Bible for years to come. I am finding the HarperCollins’s text is a nice bonus though; finally a text where words like honour, counsellor and practise are spelled correctly :)

  14. I thought I was the only one who had this kind of fetish/sickness ;-)
    I have recently went on a bible buying spree. Cambridge Goatskin KJV as well as Single column ESV (Goatskin) and Classic Thinline ESV (Goatskin). If someone was to publish a parallel KJV/ESV wide margin wrapped in Goatskin… that would be the bible for me!!!
    I have considered buying a KJV and ESV Thinline and sending them off to be rebound together in one volume.
    Anyone seen Tony Reinke’s “Blank Bible” project? http://spurgeon.wordpress.com/2006/11/30/tss-blank-bible-index/

  15. Eric – where did you find the “Single column ESV (Goatskin) and Classic Thinline ESV (Goatskin)” editions in goatskin? I have only seen them in calfskin. Its exciting if they are somewhere in goatskin.

  16. HAPPY THANKSGIVING Bible Binding bloggers!!!
    I have to wonder what a binding with turkey is like. Introducing the New ESV Turkey bound Thanksgiving edition…a bible to be thankful about all year long.

  17. “You are not alone! There are people out there who share your obsessive interest in quality and aesthetics, and this is where they hang out.”
    I’m one that is tired of expensive but cheaply put together Bibles. Once upon a time (AKA, when I was a kid) even the cheapest gift bible had a sewn binding. Not so now.
    Any thoughts on the Reformation Study Bible?

  18. Chuck, my thoughts on the Reformation Study Bible are found in the review I did of the Spirit of the Reformation Study Bible, which I find the better of the two:
    http://jmarkbertrand.typepad.com/bibledesign/2007/09/spirit-of-the-r.html
    I will say that my original NKJV New Geneva Study Bible (the precursor to the RSB) has held up pretty well over the years. I get the impression the new RSBs aren’t made to quite as high a standard, but perhaps I’m wrong.

  19. I’ve been browsing here for almost a month now. I stumbled on this blog while looking for a higher quality bible for study and daily use. The article about wide margin bibles was the first one that I read and has prompted a purchase and also provoked me to try something new. After all of my years in university and the many bibles that I own, I’ve never written in a single text or bible. I’ve finally purchased my first quality bible and have started reading it, though I’ve not yet written in it as it’s only a week old to me still. If you’re wondering, I bought a brown-red In Touch NASB and also three Pigma Micron pens sized 01 (0.25mm) in brown, orange, and black ink. I’ll quit typing here and post the other thoughts I’ve been saving in the relevant places, just wanted to introduce myself.

  20. @ Matt : I completely misspoke… My two ESV’s are Calfskin. My new Cambridge Wide Margin KJV is Goatskin. Thanks for the correction.

  21. Yesterday I was elated to have (finally) found this blog for the first time. Finally, a group of likeminded people! After taking the time to read through many of the comments posted here, I have a few questions relating to my own search for a bible. And dearly hope the fine folks over here have some of the answers!
    I must first apologize in advance for the length of this comment in the web-ADD era’s self imposed rule of 2-3 paragraphs maximum. While I could hammer people with a long list of short succinct questions that would hopefully get me to the answer I think I am seeking, I think it would be far more beneficial to provide a complete description of what I am after in order that those more knowledgeable than myself actually have the information needed to render an accurate opinion.
    —————————————————————————————————————————
    ~~~~ Skip to the end for a summary of questions without the full picture ~~~~
    —————————————————————————————————————————
    I should start with my general ending goal and minimum specifications for my new bible. I intend to use this bible almost every day for the next 30++ years in daily teachings, travel, and everyday study, so quality and craftsmanship are of the utmost importance to me, as is readability…. And then size and usefulness and everything else (so in other words, just like many of the other people here, I’m searching for the perfect bible!)
    ~~ Basic specs: ~~
    KJV, wide margin, best goatskin cover available (emphasis on practicality and durability over looks), a good durable sewn binding, opaque paper that doesn’t show too much bleed, and a somewhat reasonable size (read that, lack of excessive extra materials bound into the back).
    Also of note: I am relatively new to the field of fine crafted bibles and their history. If I make a comment that seems to fly in the face of what you know to be true… kindly correct me, I am going off what I know and have observed, some of which is almost guaranteed to be false.
    ~~~~Past experience with bibles~~~~
    My past experience has been with Oxford KJV wide margin bibles. My mother has a 30+ year old oxford bound in Morocco Goatskin that has held up beautifully to daily abuse. A friend of mine has a 10yr old Oxford that when put up next to my mothers bible for comparison… well.. doesn’t compare at all. The binding on the newer oxford is far less precise and the pages are far less opaque, to the point of interfering with readability. I should note that the newer Oxford is, to my untrained eye, “genuine leather”. It says “Colina Grain Hide” on the box, but google’s never heard of it and the quality just isn’t up to specs for even calfskin. I have never owned a Cambridge, although the ones my friends have seem to have held up a bit less over the years than those who had oxfords.
    —————————————————————————————————————————
    ~~~~ Two courses of action available: ~~~~
    1) Find one to buy
    2) Have one custom bound
    NOTE: I did find and contact Allans of Scotland last week. Unfortunately they do not produce a wide margin bible of any sorts and do not do custom work.
    ~~~~ First Option: Find one to buy ~~~~
    Oxford wide margins, of which I have the most past experience with, seem to have all but faded from the scene, with very few available, and NONE that I can find in goatskin. The only one that I could find was a calfskin version over at cbd.com
    Cambridge does offer a wide margin in goatskin (hooray!) however the HxWxD measurements online suggest that the bible is a bit too big to be of practical everyday use, and it’s also one of those editions that includes everything but the kitchen sink in the back of the bible (concordance, dictionary, note paper, blank paper, maps, etc).
    ~~~~ Second Option: Have one custom bound ~~~~
    I can probably get a set of unbound Oxford Brevier Clarendon KJV Wide Margin sheets, which would then leave me with the task of locating a true master crafter to bind the goatskin cover to the pages. (anyone have any recommendations?).
    Since I would already be having the bible custom bound, another thought occurred to me: Why not have the volumes of personal study notes and appendices that I already have condensed down, printed on bible paper, and bound into the back of the bible in place of the usual concordances and dictionaries that I have no use for anyway. I have more than enough content to print a 50-100 page appendix of my own and the typeface and layout would be a far more compressed format than I would be able to handwrite it in.
    This idea REALLY excites me and is one of the reasons I’m leaning strongly towards the custom bound option… at least until someone brings me back down to earth. Of course this would also require that I find a printer capable of printing on a bible paper and willing to do a short run (single copy) print of it.
    —————————————————————————————————————————
    ~~~~Summary of questions (that I can think of):~~~~
    (1) What is more “likely” to last longer under daily usage, a current edition Oxford / Cambridge or a custom bound one?
    (2) Anyone know of a printer that can do the printing for a custom appendix?
    (3) What the heck happened to Oxford? I can find very little from them these days in comparison to Cambridge
    (4) I had always thought Oxfords to be of a higher quality than Cambridge, an (inexperienced) opinion that does not appear to be shared by the more experienced folks here… should I be abandoning my past view?
    (5) Is there any other game in town besides Cambridge/Oxford to purchase a quality KJV wide margin from?
    (6) Custom leather slipcover from the folks over at renaissance-art.com — purely on the grounds of long term durability for the bible, good idea or bad one? (Does it add extra stress on the binding because it’s not as limp as the original bible’s goatskin cover?)
    7) Paper quality – is this something that I really have any control over or is it pretty much take what you can get? Also, Oxford VS Cambridge, any thoughts in regards to paper?
    ~~~~Questions pertaining specifically to the binding of a custom bound bible: ~~~~
    (1) Anyone know a good (magnificent) custom bindery? I saw Paul Sawyer mentioned in another post. Availability of materials to them would of course also be of note. I had hoped for the highland (no heat) goatskin, but that is a minor quibble not a major one)
    (2) Full-yapp (if available) or semi-yapp? Advantages of one or the other in regards to durability?
    (3) Edge gilding – is this purely an aesthetic issue or does it impart an increase in durability?
    (4) Silk or Leather lining?
    (5) I’m assuming full sewn is the best way to go…
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    ~~~~If you made it reading this far, THANKS!~~~~
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

  22. Well for starters I can’t really comment on any of the custom options at all really. I’m also curious why you want goatskin and are ruling out calfskin? I can’t imagine that there is much difference in the long term, but I could be wrong I suppose. There seems to be very few options in bibles (for you) that are still available for purchase anymore, though I found quite a few results at affordable prices from amazon and christianbook, etc.
    After some checking the bible that seems to match your requirements the best (due to it’s thinner size than the other three) appears to be this one:
    Cambridge Cameo in Calfskin
    ISBN 9780521536967
    Followed closely by:
    Cambridge Concord in Goatskin
    ISBN 9780521536981
    Cambridge Concord in Calfskin
    ISBN 9780521509183
    Oxford Brevier in Calfskin
    ISBN 9780191179518
    In my opinion Cambridge has the finest bible paper I have ever laid hands on, though I’ve never seen a high quality Oxford in person. Hopefully someone else can pitch in with more information on other binding and custom options though. I’m sure there are other options I’ve overlooked but that is the best I can do with google in 30 minutes. Hope it helps somewhat.

  23. Francis,
    wide margin and portability are mutually exclusive. There are very few publishers that are printing the KJV in a wide margin edition, even less are printing one that would be “portable”. Sadly, Cambridge has stopped printing the Cameo edition which is more compact than the Concorde edition. The Concorde wide margin is 7.25″ x 9″ x 1.5″ with a font size of 8 pt.
    I am a proponent of owning a Bible quiver, owning more than one Bible to fill specific needs. If you are actually considering the expense of a custom re-bind maybe you should consider owning more than one Bible to that end. For studying purposes I use a wide margin Bible, for reading I use a personal size Bible and for teaching purposes I use a large print. For me, the size of the Concorde wide margin is not too large to tote. I have never really been turned off by the size of a Bible, but then again I am on the large side with big cartoon hands.

  24. (1) Anyone know a good (magnificent) custom bindery? I saw Paul Sawyer mentioned in another post. Availability of materials to them would of course also be of note. I had hoped for the highland (no heat) goatskin, but that is a minor quibble not a major one)
    (2) Full-yapp (if available) or semi-yapp? Advantages of one or the other in regards to durability?
    (3) Edge gilding – is this purely an aesthetic issue or does it impart an increase in durability?
    (4) Silk or Leather lining?
    (5) I’m assuming full sewn is the best way to go…
    Francis – Good to have you on the blog. Regarding a few of your rebinding questions I will give them a go…
    1) I plan on trying Paul Sawyer out later this month (have him rebind an ESV journaling bible adding red edges and a goatskin cover). I have used Mechling book bindery in the past and they did great work although you must specify with them what exactly you want and with both guys must be will to drop over a $100 for the project (i.e. goatskin, extra pages, raised bands on the spine, etc). I believe both provide the no heat goatskin at an additional fee (additional $50 for mechling). Google “Harmatan Goatskin” and you can read more about the tannery that Mechling uses for their non-heated skins. Although the regular goatskin is quite nice and very similiar to the non heat skins.
    2) Only Paul Sawyer provides true semi or full yapp from the two I mentioned. It is meant to protect the page edges (full meaning that it is more protected but impedes usability IMHO). I prefer semi yapp.
    3)the gold is simply a decor
    4)I will let you know about the silk when I use Paul Sawyer in a couple weeks…Mechling uses a nice sheepskin for their leather linings which I like with the goatskin…it is very limp.
    5)full or smyth sewn is the way to go…both binders can sew a bible you send in.

  25. Good morning all,
    Matt –
    thanks for info on bindings. If I did the custom binding I would probably do the custom appendix in the back as well, which would take me a few months to assemble, so I can wait and let you be the guinea pig =)
    Nathan –
    thanks for the ISBN numbers, I hadn’t been able to find a couple of them before.
    I also just found out that the Oxford wide margin is now out of print (as of 3 years ago), although there are still a few sources for it.
    Jesus –
    Sadly I realize that most wide margins cross over the line from “portable” to being relegated to a desk bible, although a IMO there are a few that can at least toe the line. But then again I grew up toting a hardback KJV/NIV/AMP/NASB parallel monstrosity around, so my definition of “portable” is probably a little bigger than most people’s =) (THAT parallel bible, for the record, is NOT very portable)
    I do agree with you about owning a variety of bibles. My bookshelf for home study is littered with various translations, although they are all of the less expensive variety. For truly portable travel I have an old 4”x5.5” red calfskin bound oxford ruby that is still in great condition. Although I’d like to expand my collection a bit with a few more ‘nicer’ bibles in the future, the sizeable stack of student loans I just exited our institutions of higher learning suggest that day is yet a bit of a ways off.
    For my usage, much of my studying is done on the go away from where I would keep a larger home study volume. While I’m a big fan of owning a variety of bibles, I’m also the kind of person that plays favorites, I’ll go with one single bible that I’ll use 85% of the time, littering it with generous notes about everything and using it so much that it becomes a veritable extension of me. It’s also important to me to have my notes close at hand (at least the ones that I deem good enough to write in a margin).
    Which brings the discussion back around to price: Having already established above that I am a recent graduate of the educational system and therefore quite poor, saving money and not buying excess are good things :) … however when it comes to the purchase of a tool that I will use on a daily basis for the next 30+ years, I will NOT pinch pennies. If an extra $50 now gets me an extra 2-5 years of wear on a bible and a slightly easier time using it over the course of 30 years, that’s money well spent IMO.
    Mathematically speaking, time is money. If it costs me $200 extra to have a bible custom bound with my own 100 page custom appendix in the back, and I saved 30 hours of laborious work cramming notes into every crack and semi-blank crevice I could find in a standard edition, then that’s money saved, not spent :)
    Can anyone speak to the quality of a custom bound bible VS a Cambridge / Oxford?
    Main important points of comparison for me are durability and ease of use.
    I do realize this is extremely dependent on the particular custom bindery, but your guess in this case is better than mine. Perhaps I should restate the question to read: is it possible for the quality of a custom bound bible to surpass that of a fine Cambridge or oxford, and if so, what are the odds of that happening?

  26. “is it possible for the quality of a custom bound bible to surpass that of a fine Cambridge or oxford, and if so, what are the odds of that happening?”
    Francis – It is rare but seems possible for a custom bound bible to surpass a Cambridge edition (with the exception of an Allan’s bible) but as of late Cambridge seems to be leading the way with well made and luxurious bibles (see the wide-margin NASB reviewed on this site) . If you like a Cambridge edition I would stick with it. I consider rebinding when I have a cheap edition that I want to improve for usability and longevity (for instance Crossway makes a wide margin ESV but it is only available in a plastic-type genuine leather so it would be a candidate for rebinding). You always take a chance with rebinding…for instance I have had one bible done by Mechling that came back beautiful although a little stiff in the spine, while a couple others came back extremely limp when I propped the spine up (also see Mark’s Mechling binding project on this site)…in general I am pleased with all of my rebindings.
    Paul Sawyer will add the appendix you mentioned if you send it to him ready to be bound (he can also cut the book block so the edges line up).

  27. -Jesus
    Thanks for link. I had known about the staedtler pigment liners, but their color selection is dismal. I’ve got a set of the prismacolors 005 colors on order now, cant wait.
    -Matt
    Ahh so it’s a crapshoot either way… that’s what I was afraid of (Cambridge KJV was published in 2003…. I wonder if that was before or after they got their act together) … thanks for the info.
    Thinking I might go ahead and give a stock Cambridge a try while working on an appendix.
    Going back to Nathans suggestion of a Cameo…. I hadn’t thought of that previously (since they are largely unavailable now) … anyone have any good or bad words to say about it versus the Concord? From what little I can ascertain online it seems that the only real difference is that the cameo is more of an old school typeface like the oxford, whereas the concord is more of a modern Times typeface.
    I’m really lamenting the complete unavailability of India paper… I don’t suppose anyone has a 15 year old Oxford or Cambridge printed on India paper that’s been sitting on their shelf for all those years unused that they want to unload? =D

  28. If you have a retailer near you that carries Cambridge bibles you might have a look at them in person. I’ve been very impressed by the quality of the Concord as well as the NASB wide margin. I’ve not seen the Cameo in person and can’t really comment on it too much. Nothing beats trying before you buy though and it might help you form a better opinion on it.

  29. sadly none of the bookstores / Christian book stores within a semi-reasonable distance of here carry ANY “nice” bibles. Considering That I’m inside the “bible belt” and in a major city, that really is a sad commentary on what the market for good bibles is, which in turn is a sad reflection on the general attitude towards the word of God these days…. but I digress :)
    I’m also thinking of just paying a couple dollars more and getting one from a reputable online retailer with a good return policy…. If it doesn’t pass muster, just send it back.
    I’m waiting until after this weekend though… there is a lady at my church who has a VERY thick bible (as thick or THICKER than my Zondervan 4 translation parallel bible) … I’ve got to find out what exactly it is… I have a bad feeling its the oxford I was looking at, which would immediately take it out of the picture and leave just the Cambridge Cameo and Concord… Concord is a plus because its available in goatskin… Cameo is only calfskin or bonded….. I kinda like the old school typeface better though.

  30. Neat Blog! This has definitely raised my awareness on the physical aspects of the bible. Thanks for putting this information out.

  31. Hi Mark,
    I ran across your website while googling for images of the “New Geneva Study Bible” for my LibraryThing account and was pleasantly surprised that anyone was this interested in Bible designs! I myself am an addict of illuminated bibles and how really old bibles were laid out. My new favorite is the Archaeological Study Bible (although not the translation) and I was surprised to find that you only mention the page skins in passing. :( I got the Personal Edition so it’s not so hefty, but I haven’t noticed that I lost anything from the Regular Edition.
    I really wish you would do a proper review of the Archaeological Study Bible and all it’s features. I know they have their own website and all, but you’re an outside, independent source! :o)
    I also don’t know what all the hoopla is over the ESV edition. I grew up on the KJV and love the old language, read to the kids from the NIV, take the NKJV to church, but prefer the NASB. I just can’t get past some of the words the translators chose in places for the ESV. I guess it’s just SO DIFFERENT from what I’m used to… I’m trying though. I’ve been listening to Max read it to me since the first of the year…

  32. Hey everybody! Just a quick question regarding a new issue I have hopefully you all can help me.
    So I just bought an Allan Highland goatskin Brevier Clarendon, the new Allan (pocket) journal, and the Allan Cruden’s concordance in goatskin leather. So as you can see I am putting my armory together using only the finest spiritual weapons available. So here is where I need your help…
    I need a high quality Bible carrying case, or bag, or something that you all( being the connoisseurs that you are of the finest Bible products in the world) recommend that reflects the incomparable quality of the Bible products that I already own. Any companies or unique leather workers that you all recommend that can appease my taste?

  33. Hi there, I love this blog and have been reading it for a while. Have been collecting Bibles for a few years now (own several Cambridge editions) and have been interested in much of the talk about the NLT2 (I own a couple of the NLT1 editions). I would be interested to know if anyone has yet found an edition of the NLT2 in Black Letter, hopefully in some sort of sensible binding?? I have been searching for some time without success – the nearest I have come is in acquiring a cheap bonded leather compact edition, which is Black Letter – but the text is just too small to be comfortable, also I’m not looking for a study Bible.
    Thanks.

  34. I’ll give a bump to Linda’s request…who’s got a black-letter NLT 2ed, text or reference only? Cheap-cover Compacts or Giant Print hardbacks don’t count. All the decent editions seem to be red-letter.

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